3 TIPS TO CREATE A CALM SPACE FOR SENSORY CHALLENGES

22.2 PEBBLES

Pebble PillowsNearly 1 in 5 people in the United States alone have sensory issues. Have you ever been bothered by a shirt tag brushing your skin? Or the feel of the gritty sand while lying on a blanket? That mildly would describe how a person with sensory issues responds to certain textures, touch, sounds and odors. They are overly sensitive to things that we don’t even register as uncomfortable or are simply mildly discomforting. Sand on their body may feel like daggers on their skin or the smell of a strong perfume could make them sick. Many people in the Autistic spectrum have sensory issues. So, if a person has ADHD, Aspergers, developmental delay, OCD to name a few there’s a good chance they are sensitive to touch, smells and sounds.  Design therapy is all about creating an environment for a person to be at their best. Here’s 3 quick  tips to creating the right environment for the sensory challenged; think calm, cocooning and cushy, the 3 C’s.

  1. Calm – Soft, neutral, but happy colors such as lavenders, soft blues and corals,
  2.  Cocooning – Heavy, warm throws (even if you live in a warm climate).  Heavy pressure on the body calms, like a massage.
  3. Cushy – Bean bags, deep, soft sofas, floor pillows, things that envelope the body give a feeling of security and anchoring. Imagine a baby being swaddled and held.

To see images of sensory spaces and learn more go to www.DiMareDesign.com

 

Deborah rosenberg

About Deborah rosenberg

Deborah DiMare is a PETA advocate, was a featured interior designer on TLC, has appeared on NBC’s 'The Today Show' and continually lectures and writes articles on Humane and Sensory Design.
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